George Thomas: the Irish Rajah of India

George Thomas: The Irish Rajah of India

George Thomas: The Irish Rajah of India

The surprising story of a young lad from Ireland who became a Rajah in India

While speaking with my fellow history enthusiast I came across a man named George Thomas: the Irish Rajah of India. I was very intrigued by this. How did an Irish Rajah never make it into our history books?

I did some research and indeed such a man did exist. He is a part of multiple memoirs too. George Thomas has gone down in books as an incredible man, one who won plenty battles in his time in the subcontinent.

This victorious stories though seem very fishy. All these memoirs he stars in as a hero have been penned down by Europeans. Back in the 18th century European men, especially those away from their homeland had a special talent to record facts in a very dramatic fashion. These exaggerated facts made their way onto Army men’s boss’s desks and then were passed into other influential hands, often changing the order of events. Sometimes or rather most of the times, these stories were cooked up to impress unassuming naive young ladies back home in Europe.

Considering all this, what remains the crux of George Thomas’ life is the fact that he did lead a rather remarkable one. Thomas went from being a nobody from Tipperary in Ireland to the Rajah of Hansi in India. So how did his life play out? Read more about George Thomas: The Irish Rajah of India

Highnoon in the Raj Part 3

Highnoon in the Raj- Part 3

Highnoon in the Raj- Part 3

This is the last part of the three part series written by Gerald Kuchyt. Read the previous part here

 

Franz Ferdinand had begun his journey in Bombay, travelled south and was mesmerised by the North-east.

The Archduke absolutely loved the tea clad hills of Darjeeling,

“A wall of fog as if grown out of the valleys lies just up to the throning peaks which emerge out of the clouds. In olympic calm, bloom and decay of peoples these ephemeral being in the aeons of existence. A feeling of helplessness overcame me in view of nature at such a grand scale that even the most hard headed person has to bow in humility.”

Read more about Highnoon in the Raj- Part 3

Deciphering the Pandav Caves

Deciphering the Pandav Caves

Uncover the relatively unknown Pandavleni in Nashik 

Nashik is India’s wine capital. It produces about 75% of the total wine produced in the country. However this is a recent development. About 2000 years ago, the region around Nashik was not a wine producing area but a centre of Buddhist activities.To remember its cultural past, Nashik sports its very own cave complex- the Pandavleni.

It was my first visit to Nashik and the temperatures in summer were a gruesome 40 celsius. So it was after much debate that we decided to save our visit to the Pandavleni for another trip in winter.  Read more about Deciphering the Pandav Caves

Highnoon In The Raj- Part 2

Highnoon In The Raj- Part 2

This is the second part of the three part series written by Gerald Kuchyt. Read the first part here

Franz Ferdinand had been to Ceylon where he was mesmerised by the people and the culture. From there he journeyed to the busy city of Bombay. He wrote about his first impression of Bombay-

“A thick fog covered the sea during the morning. When the veil lifted the profile of Bombay and the surrounding mountains became visible.”

He was again taken up by the people and the culture in this vast country under the British Raj- Hindustan.

From Bombay, he ventured into south Indian cities of Tadur (Telangana) and Hyderabad. Read more about Highnoon In The Raj- Part 2

Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers

6 Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers

6 Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers

Tips when you plan your British holiday, from a heritage lover’s experience

The red telephone boxes, London black cabs, the Monarchy and history are what entice me to the United Kingdom. The UK has held my fascination for years. It was a dream to visit this country and see the red telephone booths, the Underground and the many historical monuments with my own eyes.

My travels led to the northern Scottish Highlands and down south to London. If I were given a month to explore Britain it wouldn’t suffice! The castles that adorn the Aberdeenshire county in Scotland and the well known heritage buildings in London are simply overwhelming.

Where to travel to? What to see and what to skip? Deciding which destinations to explore in Britain is indeed very difficult.

Unfortunately I wasn’t able to visit Aberdeenshire. This county in Scotland has about 300 beautiful castles whether they be ruins or mighty fortresses.

In this article I would like to recollect and point you to the top 6 Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers. This list might make it easy to plan a trip and not miss the beautiful historical destinations. I have personally visited these historical sites. There are of course hundreds more that you can explore which are equally magnificent.

If you decide to travel to all the mainstream destinations in the UK, you must take some time to visit these and add them to your list if you haven’t already.

I must advice you- make sure you at least read a gist of British history. Britain has a huge, vast history. If you don’t know any, you could easily be lost!

Lets begin with our Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers Read more about 6 Must See Historical Destinations in England and Scotland for Heritage Lovers

Hampi, Living History in all its Glory

Hampi: Living History in all its Glory

Hampi: Living History in all its Glory

Suvendu Rout narrates his travel experience to this magnificent world heritage site of Hampi in India

 

Hampi, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is a treat to all your senses. Its grandeur will leave you spellbound. Often when you hear lofty praises about a place, your expectations become so high that the actual experience could be a let-down! There are very few places that rise above your expectations; Hampi is one of them. Hampi, in south India is quite a marvel- history, heritage, architecture, nature, people, culture- all packed into a small bundle of joy. Last December (2017) I experienced this magical land and I will cherish the memory forever. I would like to share my vivid experience with you.

Read more about Hampi: Living History in all its Glory

Highnoon in the Raj

Highnoon in the Raj- Part 1

Highnoon in the Raj- Part 1

Franz Ferdinand’s World Tour, 1892-93: Sri Lanka and India

 

On 28 June 1914 while visiting Sarajevo the Archduke and heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie were assassinated, sparking off the fuse that would light the world ablaze in the first world war. Due of this event his name lives in infamy, but much of his life has been forgotten.

In his own life one episode of great international sensation was his world tour in which upon his coming of age he traveled abroad; customary for European princes at that time. His journal provides us with one of the most detailed accounts of India in the 19th century, its places people, beliefs, history, culture, society and more.

He departed on 12 December 1892 via a train from Vienna to the port of Trieste in the Adriatic Sea. From Trieste he traveled to Greece and the Isle of Crete, to Egypt and through the Suez Canal to Aden in South Arabia. He crossed the Arabian Sea where he reached Ceylon on 5 January 1893. Shrouds of mist covered the horizon as Franz’s ship the SMS Kaiserin Elisabeth approached Colombo where many Sinhalese came out in boats to greet him. Read more about Highnoon in the Raj- Part 1

A Masterpiece of a Well: Adalaj Ni Vav

A Masterpiece of a Well: Adalaj Ni Vav

A Masterpiece of a Well: Adalaj Ni Vav

This unique stepwell 18 km from Ahmedabad will take your breath away….

King Rana Veer Singh was the ruler of Dandai Desh, the area around today’s Adalaj. He was a descent from the Vaghela dynasty. A dynasty whose end was caused by Allauddin Khilji of the Delhi Sultanate.

King Rana Veer Singh was sensitive towards his subjects, especially their need for water considering the arid conditions in his kingdom. To provide for year round water for his subjects, the King decided to build a stepwell. Read more about A Masterpiece of a Well: Adalaj Ni Vav

Razia Sultan: India’s Most Underrated Ruler

Razia Sultan: India’s Most Underrated Ruler

Razia Sultan: India’s Most Underrated Ruler

Razia Sultan’s short reign in the 13th century was more radical than any other in Indian history

We’ve read about Boudica’s wrath and Joan of Arc’s exemplary leadership. We’ve heard great stories of Queens and lady warriors in Europe and Russia but do we have similar counterparts in India as well?

Yes we do.

India, has been a vast country never fully united in history like it is today. But India’s capital Delhi has seen power struggle and court politics for centuries together.

Most of us may point to the Mughals and say that they were the first to rule from the region of Delhi. Although this is not true.

The first Islamic rulers in India were not the Mughals but the Delhi Sultanate rulers. They came to the subcontinent from Turkey. Since they haven’t left many beautiful monuments to gawk at unlike the flamboyant Mughals, the Delhi Sultanate is almost forgotten by us today.

Nonetheless, as history would have it, the Delhi Sultanate left behind something more important and awe inspiring than even the Taj Mahal– a female ruler.

This female ruler is known to us as Razia Sultan. Unfortunately she isn’t a part of folklore as much as she should be. Razia Sultan is not even prominently mentioned in history textbooks. Let us set history right today and learn more about this incredible Muslim female ruler. Read more about Razia Sultan: India’s Most Underrated Ruler

The Curse of Fatehpur Sikri

The Curse of Fatehpur Sikri

The Curse of Fatehpur Sikri

This beautiful city Emperor Akbar built had a tragic fate

Red sandstone on more intricately carved sandstone and in that sea of red, a peaceful white marble abode, calm and serene. That is how you could describe Fatehpur Sikri.

I visited the cities of Delhi and Agra a couple of years ago. It was one of those long awaited school trips, the best of the lot. Needless to say, we had tremendous fun. It was icing on the cake that this trip came long with a package of many historical monuments.

Amongst these plethora of historical monuments, is the city of Fatehpur Sikri. If you look at legends, the origins of Fatehpur Sikri all point to Emperor Akbar.  Read more about The Curse of Fatehpur Sikri