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5 Stories of Items That You Used Today

5 Stories of Items That You Used Today

You must have definitely used these 5 items today, yet are you sure you know their story?

We use so many items everyday, right from texting a friend to hurriedly checking your watch because you are late for the early morning lecture. In these stressful times, there are certain things who help us get through the day. Most of them never existed 100 years ago. What are these magic items and who are these magicians who invented them?

Read on for 5 original Stories of Items That You Used Today

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6 Things You Never Knew About the Pied Piper

6 Things You Never Knew About the Pied Piper

6 Things You Never Knew About the Pied Piper

Pied Piper is perhaps one of the most haunting of stories and it gets even more interesting

We’ve all heard the Pied Piper story. The Pied Piper just like the Bogeyman, is a good way to scare children. “The Pied Piper will come and get you! Be a good girl/boy, alright?”

Let us revisit the the Pied Piper story.

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Inside The BMC Building

Inside The BMC Building

Inside The Bombay Municipal Corporation Building

The BMC building in the south of the Mumbai city is mostly unnoticed. Explore this building from the inside

 

The city of Mumbai never sleeps. Trains leave the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Train Terminus each and everyday. People pour out of this building in floods, so very busy in their work.

This CST station building is undoubtedly a UNESCO World Heritage site. Fredrick William Stevens designed this incredible structure. Yet did you know, the Victoria Terminus, as it was called, wasn’t supposed to be the jewel. Fredrick William Stevens had built another building, he wanted to put emphasis on this building. This was Steven’s crowning glory.

Inside The BMC Building
The BMC building

The building that stands just opposite the CST station is famously known to be the Mumbai Municipal Corporation building. In our negligent knowledge of Mumbai’s rich heritage, we have looked past this building. It’s just another old building in the south of Bombay, or is it?

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Slaying Jack the Ripper

Slaying Jack The Ripper

Slaying Jack The Ripper

The Murderer who ‘Ripped’ through London

*Warning: Disturbing Images

Have you heard about the Ripper? It is one of the bloodiest serial murder cases ever to occur on earth.

In 1888, London wasn’t the clean city we know today. Poverty, sickness and stench was everywhere. The poor had to build themselves a living. To pull this off, some had to resort to extreme cases. The Ripper took advantage of this situation.

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7 Original Stories of Nursery Rhymes

7 Original Stories of Nursery Rhymes

7 Original Stories of Nursery Rhymes

We grew up listening to these nursery rhymes. Are they as innocent as they seem? Surely…..not

In the middle ages i.e.. 5th to the 15th centuries, most of the population was illiterate. Spreading news across the region took months! No one wants stale or cooked news right?

The best way to spread news quickly and make sure that everyone understood it, was to rhyme the news. Rhyming words used along with repetition and onomatopoeia helped people remember these jingles.

Over time some of these nursery rhymes were sung for and by innocent young children. Most parents do not know the really gruesome and unbelievable stories behind these rhymes.

Here is a list of 7 Original Stories of Nursery Rhymes

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Kamlabai Kamat

Pioneering Mothers of Indian Cinema

Pioneering Mothers of Indian Cinema

India’s first female actress, Kamlabai Kamat revolutionised Indian Cinema at 15

Dadasaheb Phalke is well known as the father of Indian Cinema. He learnt his art form London and published India’s first silent film titled Raja Harishchandra. As of 2014, Bollywood grosses upto ₹3,500 crore whilst back then, Phalke paid a waiter’s salary of ₹10 or ₹15 to his lead character.

Raja Harishchandra was an immediate hit. Although Dadasaheb Phalke had gone through a lot of efforts to find a female lead, he had to finally cast Salunke, a man, as a female. Subsequently, in this film many a man depicted females since the society barred the fairer sex from the silver screen.

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Princess Elizabeth & the Duke of Edinburgh

A Peak Into Princess Elizabeth & the Duke of Edinburgh’s Wedding

A Peak Into Princess Elizabeth & the Duke of Edinburgh’s Wedding

Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh are all set to celebrate their platinum wedding anniversary. Their’s was a fairytale story that most of us don’t know about

Think about it like this- The Queen and her husband have been married for more years than you have even lived.

Most people who had visited their wedding are no more and almost none of us don’t remember the two tying the knot. For us, the Queen has always had her grey hair and her husband two steps behind her.

When the Princess Elizabeth & the Duke of Edinburgh wed in Westminster Abbey on 20th November, 1947 they were the spectacle of the season. The entire nation and commonwealth celebrated, sending their wishes and gifts. Britons had their ears trained to the radio (because there was no tele) and humongous crowds had gathered at the Mall all the way till the Abbey.

Princess Elizabeth & the Duke of Edinburgh
Most of us have seen the Queen with her grey hair and her husband alongside her

People recalled that the day had started off rather gloomily with grey clouds but the bride made the day as bright as spring itself. As she headed from Buckingham Palace with her father George VI, the crowds were eager to catch a glimpse of their Princess Elizabeth in her wedding gown.

That day was like a fairytale and so were the events leading up to that day. The story had started almost a decade ago when the Princess was just 13. This story has it all- a scheming Uncle, a Naval Officer, too many obstacles and initial public displeasure.

Did you think being the most eligible bride in the UK would have been easy for the Princess?

Let me tell you this charming story that lead up to a robust 70 year marriage and get you all starry-eyed.

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Undeciphered Voynich Manuscript

Breaking the World’s Most Mysterious Code: The Voynich Manuscript

Breaking the World’s Most Mysterious Code:

The Voynich Manuscript

The Voynich Manuscript is the biggest unsolved code in the world. What is it that fascinates people to find it?

You might have never heard about the undeciphered Voynich manuscript. It is not really that famous in the Eastern part of the world. Whilst watching a video on the world’s most strangest books, I came across this name. Fascinated by it, I also found the manuscript’s mention in the world’s biggest unsolved mysteries. This is when things got interesting.

The Voynich Manuscript is one of the world’s biggest unsolved mysterious. Even though it may seem familiar to my earlier blog about the undeciphered Indus script, this manuscript is different. In case of the Indus script, decipherers don’t have the necessary information. On the contrary, the Voynich manuscript is a long and well-illustrated 240 pages manuscript.

Undeciphered Voynich Manuscript
The writing in the manuscript is an unknown, a strange code

The Voynich Manuscript is written in the Voynich Code, one of the few codes from middles ages that is still undeciphered today. Decoding this code is much like a game: legendary decoders have tried and failed. The Voynich Code smirks at the number of people who have tried their entire lives but failed miserably.

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Indus Valley Civilisation

Theories on the Mysterious Disappearance of Indus Civilisation

Theories on the Mysterious Disappearance of Indus Civilisation

India’s first and most progressive civilisation vanished in 1700 BCE for 2 millennia, what must have happened to the people living there? Here are 2 debate provoking theories on the Mysterious Disappearance of Indus Civilisation.

The Indus Valley Civilisation is one of the world’s first civilisations. It started on the banks of the Indus river in 2600 BCE. They began cultivating land here and soon settled down.

The people who resided here might have been our ancestors, the very first ones to find their way into India. The civilisation is set to have housed 50,00,000 people. It stretched from Pakistan to north-western Indian states of Haryana, Punjab, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

Indus Valley Civilisation
The Indus Valley Civilisation stretched from Pakistan to north-western Indian states of Haryana, Punjab, Rajasthan and Gujarat.

 

The Indus Valley residents were more developed than other civilisations of their time. It would take others several centuries to build what they had. They were excellent in town planning- from building houses to sanitation. Unlike the Romans, sanitation was hygienic, roads were well lit and there were no social caste systems. They had built houses in such a way that each house would get natural light and ventilation. The bathing area was situated away from the actual town to prevent leeching of unhealthy substances into the drinking water in the city.

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India and the World: A History In Nine Stories

India and the World: A History in Nine Stories

India and the World: A History in Nine Stories

The story of India spanning millions of years in 210 objects

It was a pleasant Saturday morning, perfect for a day out at the CSMVS Museum in Mumbai. The CSMVS Mumbai launched its biggest exhibit perhaps based on valuable objects in India’s history and its connection to the world. This exhibit will be on display till February, 2018.

The exhibit is titled India and the World: A History In Nine Stories. The Museum in association with the National Museum, New Delhi and the British Museum, London has attempted to tell the story of India in 9 episodes. It starts at the very beginning of mankind 1.7 million years ago and goes on till 2015. That’s a huge transition. I must hand it to them, they’ve done a rather marvellous job.

India and the World: A History In Nine Stories

 

It is awe-inspiring to actually see the impact globalisation had over the world when humans learnt the art of trade. We are indeed social animals who connected not only with trade but with value systems and traditions much like today.

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